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The Sufi-Salafi Rift - By Carnegie Middle East Center

January 23, 2018

Click here to read the article

Comment:

This article is typical of what has been produced and published lately by so called “Libya experts” who attempt to extend their scope of writing beyond what they truly understand.
We at the NCUSLR encourage respected US institutions to show more rigor in their editorial and publishing processes.
The comment below from Zahra Langhi an expert in this field summarizes why this article is poor.

 



 “ Are the Sufis in Libya or anywhere in the region a 'social class'? Who would they be if they were a 'social class', the 'aristocrats' or the 'bourgeoisie' or the 'poor'?! Who are then the dervishes, and those around the shrines and old mosques chanting the love songs, dancing and living on Nafha (gifts for the poor)? Who are those filling the mosques in Sidi Abdel Salam AlAsmar and elsewhere? Are they the aristocrats and the royalists?  Nowhere in any literature except in Sufism you can find a praise of 'poverty'.

 

Sufi Brothers are called Ikhwan AlFuqaraa'. It's not like in the protestant ethic, success and and attainment of wealth are seen as important aspects of one's religiosity & piety. The author is probably projecting his own American protestant background. I suggest he keeps to his writings about security matters in the simplest way i.e monitoring the numbers of militias and their movement as he started as a security consultant and not take endeavours beyond his understanding such that of sociology, history and philosophy.”

 

Zahra Langhi
Director
Libyan Women’s Platform for Peace

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